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These are the earrings Chris made me for yule. She wanted to use dewey decimal numbers that indicated books that were special between us, and she used the online interface from the library I grew up in to check the numbers.





Can you identify the books? )
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In honor of National Science Fiction Day / Asimov's Birthday there is a limerick contest happening on Michael Swanwick's blog.

I grew up living on spaceships made of words (when I was traveling away from Arda, that is.) My mother used to worry that the weight of my bookshelves would have me waking up in the basement some cold morning.

I wanted SO MUCH to have the kind of access people in the stories had - information at your fingertips, books that could travel with you in bulk, friends all over the universe...

Now, I am sitting in a recliner with my laptop programing the kindle Jim got me for Yul, sharing the process with friends at all planetary points. It's my past that seems unreal to me now. Here's my limerick:


SF fans know the real race for space
was to keep all your books in their place.
Now, when bookshelf space dwindles
we fill up our kindles -
(I still keep my books - just in case)
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available here

In collaboration with artist Lee Moyer, Worldbuilders is proud to present our first calendar. Each month showcases one of history's great novelists with a classic pin-up referencing his or her work.

*Holiday Special* Order three calendars and get free US shipping! (Or $8 off your international shipping cost.)

Just enter the code: LITERACY when you check out.

Art by Lee Moyer: leemoyer.com
All proceeds go to Worldbuilders.

fileg: (a few books)
The web site is here


During the last week of September every year, hundreds of libraries and bookstores around the country draw attention to the problem of censorship by mounting displays of challenged books and hosting a variety of events. The 2011 celebration of Banned Books Week will be held from September 24 through October 1. Banned Books Week is the only national celebration of the freedom to read. It was launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, bookstores and libraries. More than 11,000 books have been challenged since 1982.

According to the American Library Association, there were 348 challenges reported to the Office of Intellectual Freedom in 2010, and many more go unreported.

The 10 most challenged titles of 2010 were:

And Tango Makes Three, by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson
Reasons: homosexuality, religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
Reasons: offensive language, racism, religious viewpoint, sex education, sexually explicit, violence, unsuited to age group

Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley
Reasons: insensitivity, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit

Crank, by Ellen Hopkins
Reasons: drugs, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit

The Hunger Games (series), by Suzanne Collins
Reasons: sexually explicit, violence, unsuited to age group

Lush, by Natasha Friend
Reasons: drugs, sexually explicit, offensive language, unsuited to age group

What My Mother Doesn't Know, by Sonya Sones
Reasons: sexism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group

Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America, by Barbara Ehrenreich
Reasons: drugs, inaccurate, offensive language, political viewpoint, religious viewpoint

Revolutionary Voices edited by Amy Sonnie
Reasons: homosexuality, sexually explicit

Twilight (series), by Stephenie Meyer
Reasons: sexually explicit, religious viewpoint, violence, unsuited to age group



I was reminded by a post by [livejournal.com profile] aimmyarrowshighon book_icons, which went on to say:

The claim that any of these novels is "unsuited to age group" is ridiculous and dangerous. My personal favorite response to these spurious, fearmongering claims comes from an anonymous mother and librarian on a Banned Books Week blog entry from several years ago: " What may be unsuitable for a lucky child at age ten or twelve or thirteen may have already happened to an unlucky child. Books are the most salient way to make sure that they understand that they are not "unsuitable." What happened to them was."

Make sure that kids and teens, both lucky and unlucky, retain their right to read in your city, school district, and life. Support Banned Books Week.
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Well, you all know I re-read Tolkien all the time, so I thought I would tell you something new -
I like to re-read, so I have a number of favorites, but I read: The Dark Is Rising almost every year at winter solstice (though I seldom go on to re-read the rest of the series)

Though not as frequently, I do re-read Rosemary Sutcliff, especially the Roman Britain books (which I first read in about the 7th grade)

And I have a great love for the 2 biographical books by S. T. Haymon, Opposite the Cross Keys and The Quivering Tree
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Missing woman found dead behind bookshelf

Like the Paper Sisters from Read or Die, I have thought that if this headline ever actually occurred, it would be me....

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